The Ashes are over, but the need to promote cricket has never been stronger

Ashes Finale

The Ashes in England are over. England 3 – Australia 0.

Much has been said of the series, elsewhere and on this blog. The scoreline suggests England were totally dominant and battered Australia, but those of us that followed almost every ebb and flow of the series are acutely aware of a few moments when Australia had the ascendency, and could have won Test Matches.

Australia lost by only 14 runs at Trent Bridge and were annihilated at Lords. They had England on the ropes on the last day at Old Trafford, before rain stole almost a full day’s play. Australia were 1/150+ chasing 290odd at Chester le-Street, but capitulated, all out for 220odd. The final Test at the Oval in London was an unusual finale.

To some degree it was framed by the “dead rubber” context, but with an Ashes Series in Australia soon after, and many of the baggy greens playing for their careers, the outcomes were always going to provide a platform of intense speculation.

In the end, the match was a draw, mostly shaped by rain and bad light. Despite the draw the final day provided plenty of drama after Australia gallantly chased the win (at first), with a quickfire 2nd innings and sporting declaration. England began their last day chase of 220odd cautiously, but the game eventually resembled an ODI. England were close to victory, they only needed 20odd runs off the final four overs. Michael Clarke looked to the umpires for a bad light ruling, and they obliged, attracting the criticism of many cricket fans around the world.

Bad Light

Interpretations of bad light, the rules, the circumstances, the use of floodlights, the colour of cricket balls and the perspectives guiding the “safety” of players need to be closely examined by the ICC.

Let’s be honest, the ICC probably won’t do anything about it soon. From the outer they appear to be an intensely conservative and slow moving, perhaps dysfunctional beast. Cricket in Australia suffers immensely from a lack of quality, progressive and visionary administration. They’re not alone.

The Promotion of Cricket

One example of the ICC’s failings lay in the concept of promoting cricket. I’ll be brief.

Australia tackled Scotland in a full international 50over match in Edinburgh the other night. It was neither promoted or televised in Australia. Why?

The match was an official part of Australia’s 2013 tour of England and Ireland. Scotland are struggling to develop cricket north of Hadrian’s Wall, they could do with some assistance. An ODI against one of cricket’s heavy weights helps, but hardly, when it’s not televised and beamed around the world. England played Ireland in an ODI too, and it was not televised. Ireland are one of the strongest emerging cricket nations who have already – in my opinion – established a formidable case to play 2nd tier Test Cricket.

Cricket Australia, the ECB and the ICC must assist these developing nations in a variety of ways, but one method would be to ensure that these matches are part of negotiated television deals.

Speaking of television. I pay over $100AUD per month to Foxtel for a satellite television package. It has about eight full-time HD sports channels, and several others, but I can’t watch the Pakistan versus Zimbabwe Test Match currently being played at Harare Sports Club. Instead there are endless replays of NRL, AFL and EPL games from 1972 and a whole bunch of rubbish sports like BMX Championships and 2nd rate college football games from the US. Get the LIVE TEST MATCH CRICKET ON please.

Going into Day Three the Pakistan v Zimbabwe Test is shaping up to be a great contest and both nations – who struggle for a variety of reasons – need positive assistance to grow their cricketing profiles.

What can cricket’s strongest boards and the ICC do about this? A heck of a lot more than they currently do…

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