Chris Rogers

The Oval – A bit of Aussie fight and some typical English weather

A couple of days into the final Test and some once familiar dynamics of Ashes Series in England, frame this match. Australia has shown some decent resolve in their batting and gloomy, wet skies have penetrated the momentum of play.

Opening the batting

On Day One Australia won their second toss of the series, batted first and made a decent fist of it. On a slow and fairly dry surface the approach demanded initial graft and patience and required batsmen to play late. David Warner wasn’t able to comply and played a loose, booming shot, devoid of footwork. A thick edge sailed to 1st slip. I’ve stated my feelings on Warner’s ability to safely open the batting, and this type of dismissal strengthens my belief that this isn’t his best position, yet.

Chris Rogers only made 23, but soaked up 100 balls. He consumed the best of the opening bowlers, softened the seam and wore the lacquer off the Duke. He protected the middle order and put on a century partnership with new number 3, Shane Watson. For me, that’s what opening in a Test Match is about.

England’s selection

England’s decision to play a second spinner is interesting, and hasn’t worked so far. But, this might, in part, be due to picking the wrong spinner. They’ve overlooked Monty Panesar, a proven left arm spinner, in favour of Simon Kerrigan, who was belted to all parts by Shane Watson. England were required to bowl 128 overs to Australia, Captain Cook felt Kerrigan was only worth 8 and he went for 6.6 per over. It’s early days and the kid might turn it around yet.

Day Two

I didn’t see a ball bowled on Day Two. I hung out last night for as long as possible, but after a solid day’s work, a gym session, a short run and 90minutes at cricket training I was pretty beat. Frustrated by the rain and poor light, I declared at about 2300. Unfortunately I missed a gallant knock by Steve Smith.

Smith was in the side a few years ago, picked in confusing circumstances as a bowling all-rounder – a leg spinner. It didn’t work for him. He went into exile and strengthened his batting in the Sheffield Shield and returned during the Border-Gavaskar trophy. He’s a fidgety customer, could be accused of having a bout of hyperbulia, but looks capable and recorded his maiden Test century overnight with a 138 not-out. Added to his two 50s this series, for me he’s done enough to be one of four certainties in Australia’s top order for the First Test in Australia.

Shane Watson

Shane Watson was on the edge of oblivion going into this Test Match. A walking LBW candidate, Watson managed to avoid his typical dismissal and made an excellent 176, saving his career, for now.

Stuart Broad

Stuart Broad’s spell in the second session on Day One included fiercely aggressive, short-pitched bowling of a high standard. Few people in the world would enjoy facing what Broad served up. Michael Clarke was forced to shut his eyes twice and put his bat out in front of his face for protection, hoping for the best as his splice and handle were struck by sharp lifters. Clarke survived Broad, but was rattled and Anderson bowled him. It was Broad who set it up. Broad also struck Watson in another nasty riser. It was a painful blow catching Watson on the underside of the helmet on the ear lobe.

I think Broad is a rhythm bowler, up and down and not much chop when he’s off colour, but fierce, accurate, challenging and versatile when he’s on the money.

The Australian series

I can’t wait for the return series in Australia, faster, bouncier and more lively pitches and good diversity should be on show from greenish Brisbane to dusty Adelaide, to the quickest pitch in the world at Perth, the all-round drop in at Melbourne and the traditional spinner at Sydney. Both bowling attacks will fancy the pitch buffet on offer.

But, we still have three days in London.

Australia declared at 9/492 and England’s openers got through 17overs for 32 runs. The forecast looks ordinary so this one could be headed for a draw. I hope there’s a twist or two to go.

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Proper Test Match batting – Day One, Third Test – Old Trafford

Finally Australia have put on a display of proper Test Match batting.

I locked myself in for the evening, along with half of Australia and much of the rest of the cricketing world, in the hope that we would at least make a contest of this match. It’s all at stake in Manchester; careers, legacies, levels of interest and of course, the Ashes urn.

No change to the England side that demolished Australia at Lords. Three changes for Australia with Ashton Agar moving out for Nathan Lyon (don’t worry, Agar is 19 he will feature again) and Phil Hughes making way for David Warner. Mitch Starc got the nod to replace the injured James Pattinson.

The day’s play

Australia won the toss and on a wicket that looked great for batting all day and beyond, it was a vital moment. A solid base was needed and Rogers and Watson began to construct it with Rogers the aggressor and Watson the cautious, watchful one. Unfortunately for the latter he got out again on a start, 19. But, it was a pearler of a delivery from Tim Bresnan. No batsmen in the world could resist that nibbling line and perfect length and Watson prodded to the delight of wicket-keeper Prior.

Rogers persisted and raced beyond fifty exhibiting a fine array of shots. His new partner Usman Khawaja seemed terrified of Graeme Swann at Lords, so it was no surprise that he was quickly set up to face his dreaded phobia. Swann took his wicket in dramatic circumstances and I’ve already reflected on the Usman Khawaja DRS fiasco.

2/92 at lunch, a reasonable start. After a round of ham sandwiches, a packet of crisps and cup of hot water infused with sub-continental tea leaves, it was out for the second session.

Rogers and Clarke pushed on, but the gritty 35 year old opener was distracted by persistent movement up at the pavilion. A few overs passed and with constant interruptions up there, Rogers grew increasingly discontent. It contributed to his downfall, with a cunning full delivery by Swann trapping him LBW, right after another incident of unsuccessful communication with the buffoons up on the deck, one of whom turns out to be club cricket mate of Rogers.

England sensed a blood bath and they circled. But, the methodical and much ameliorated Steve Smith provided precisely the foil that Captain Michael Clarke needed.

In the Lords Preview I talked about the need to bat 120 overs plus in the first innings of a Test Match, and that the ability to leave the ball was a critical component of this. On a bouncy pitch more akin to an Australian wicket both Smith and Clarke executed leave after leave with aplomb. The result was an England bowling attack who began to show signs of irritation and fatigue. As I did at about 0145, trudging off to my own pavilion a little happier than most times this series.

Final Day One observations

Although not in the same galaxy as the Khawaja incident, England had their own brush with DRS dissatisfaction. They thought they had Smith caught behind for 25 before Tea, but the field umpire disagreed, they confidently reviewed and while there was some strange tick noise, there was no other compelling evidence. Mike Atherton said it was justice to Australia – a rubbish statement. Smith consumed both of England’s reviews and remains unbeaten on 75. Here in the southern hemisphere we hope he nails his maiden century tonight.

England will fight back, they’re too good not to. The Old Trafford crowd showed signs of becoming more boisterous and will increase it’s cacophony of support in the coming days. Australia must bat on for as long as possible and not even consider the D word, at all.

The stage is set for David Warner to blast Australia to a big score once Smith and Clarke reassert Australia’s ascendency on Day Two resuming at 3/303. Let’s hope the infamous Manchester weather remains clement.

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