cricket writers

Win the toss and bat for days – The Adelaide Oval, 2nd Ashes Test

Do not win the toss and elect to bowl at the Adelaide Oval. Win it and bat for 2 days.

A simple plan and one that both captains will be hoping to institute on Thursday morning. Neither Michael Clarke or Alistair Cook will make the mistake that West Indian captain Darren Sammy made yesterday, against New Zealand in Dunedin. Sammy won the toss and elected to field. New Zealand carved out 600 runs and forced the lads from the Caribbean to bowl 150 overs before declaring.

England will be more thoughtful about declaration if they find themselves in a position of ascendency at the Adelaide Oval. In 2006 the then England captain Andy Flintoff declared England’s first innings for 550. England subsequently lost that Adelaide Test Match and the series 5-0. They’ll choose to recall their most recent experience instead. In 2010 England pounded an Australian bowling attack that could only be described as relatively sub-standard. Xavier Doherty and Marcus North toiled away attempting to fill the role of spin attack, while an injured Doug Bollinger failed to penetrate formidable and strident English batting.

This time the form suggests Australia’s bowling will present an entirely different proposition. The “Gabbatoir” performance in Brisbane last week had exponents and appreciators of aggressive quick bowling salivating. Adelaide’s pitch will be different, but exactly how different remains a mystery.

This is not the usual Adelaide wicket. The South Australian Cricket Association accepted big money from AFL to redevelop the ground and this means that for the first time in Adelaide a Test Match will be played on a “drop in” pitch sourced from elsewhere.

Only two Sheffield Shield matches have been played there this season. Shield players have described a wicket that failed to deteriorate throughout the four days. Perhaps the curator has something different in stall for this Test Match. Only time will tell.

England spent a week in Alice Springs after the Brisbane demolition. In Australia’s red centre they closed ranks and mostly avoided Australian media. Their performance in a 2 day tour match against an Australian Chairman’s XI was ordinary. Questions about their XI for this Test remain, but it seems that Gary Ballance and Tim Bresnan will replace Johnathon Trott and Chris Tremlett or Monty Panesar may be added as a second spinner. If the Australian camp feels confident in Shane Watson’s ability to bowl 15-25overs in an innings then I think they will be unchanged from Brisbane.

The next few days should deliver an enthralling cricket experience and a highly competitive sequel to the epically dramatic and one-sided first Test. Enjoy the spectacle!

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Wrung out yesterday, burned by Broad today – Aussie Ashes scattered

Armageddon?

After sleeping only 3 hours this morning after 3am, I’m substantially wrecked today, and so is Australian cricket. Some of you might think I’m being overly negative in response to the loss at Durham overnight, but we’ve a right to be armageddonist.

Remember how we felt in 2010-11 after England skittled us for 98 on Boxing Day at the MCG and replied with 0/150+ at stumps? Remember the 3-1 defeat, albeit three absolute thrashings, in that series over two years ago?

What about 4-0 down in India earlier this year?

How about being 3-0 down in England?

There shouldn’t be any bush beating here, Australia is at its lowest point for decades and it’s arguably a lower tide than the 1980s.

After an improved showing at Old Trafford last week I was amazed at how quickly the feeling of “we’re back” lurked behind media reactions. The phrase, while not quite spoken aloud, also seemed on the tip of tongues in conversations I’d had with fellow Australians. Sure, we’ve been in the odd decent position and our bowlers have often created that, but in a two-horse race run across five days there will almost always be a point where you can draw that bow.

The fact is, our batting collective is not Test standard, we lack resolve and fortitude and the evidence of this is plain and readily available. You won’t need Assange, Manning or Snowden to show it to you.

Don’t lose sight of the big issue

Without going on like a two-bob watch I must say that the odd positive on-field display should not distract us from the cancerous issues stymieing Australian cricket. The systematic destruction of our cricketing stocks is unintentionally orchestrated by dark, incompetent administrative forces and is first evident in the emaciation of talent available to Australia. Our stocks are thin. The numbers returned in the Sheffield Shield have been screaming it for years.

“Oh relax, we’ve had our time in the sun, it’s someone else’s turn”

This is the kind of statement made by those who concede defeat and disappointment with ease, and who lack the creativity and progressive attitude to launch remedial action. It’s the kind of statement that first permits, and then breeds mediocrity and it is spreading throughout Australian cricket – and many other sports – with devastating effect.

I’ve previously listed some of the issues I have with Australian cricket as early as 2011 and published more recent analysis of Australia’s Batting Demise, so I’ll now turn my attention to last night’s on-field events.

Day Four, Fourth Ashes Test – Durham

Congratulations England, you deserve the victory and the glory.

The poor application of some of Australia’s talented players can be blamed in part-only for last night’s collapse. Mostly it comes down to inferior ability and a higher quality of cricket played by England.

The morning began well for Australia, with the bowlers again doing their bit.

I was amazed at Aleem Dar’s decision to not give Tim Bresnan out when he didn’t bother to play a shot to Jackson Bird, who struck him on the pad, dead in front of the stumps. Height the only partial issue of pedantic concern. A review followed, but according to hawkeye, with half the ball smashing the stumps, Dar’s decision couldn’t be overturned. The bloke didn’t play a shot. May as well have tossed the bat away and was racked right in front. In my book that is out, all day, every day and it is only in this DRS/hawkeye world where this mantra has been eroded.

I ask then, how long will it be before the pitching outside leg criteria for LBW is questioned?

If the ball pitches outside leg you can’t be given out LBW. This rule hails from a pre-hawkeye world where umpires had to be sceptical of the angle, assuming the ball would need to do far too much to hit the stumps. Hawkeye’s exponents will argue that if it can be shown the ball will rattle the castle, then perhaps the old interpretation should be referred for review…

Ryan Harris is a superstar and his 7 wickets in England’s second innings included some absolute rippers to top order batsmen. At 33, Harris must be gutted at the realisation he may never win an Ashes Series. He will certainly never win one in England.

Crashing from 2/167 to all out for 224 in the final session last night was a bitter blow, but as I’ve written here it should remind us of the bigger issues in Australian cricket. Stuart Broad’s evening spell was a catalogue of high class bowling, deft captaincy and good fielding. How this Australian camp can regroup and perform well at The Oval in a week is beyond me. That dressing room must be an horrific place today…

Just think, we’ve got 6 more Tests against England and then we’re away for 3 against the world’s best Test side and bowling attack, South Africa. Look out.

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