Phil Hughes

Kohli struck in helmet: Indian captain ducks into Johnson

India have just lost their second wicket and stand-in captain Virat Kohli, the world’s 2nd most marketable sports star, arrives at the crease. A fired up Mitchell Johnson has removed Murali Vijay, caught behind for 53. Vijay looked set and was headed for a big score, before Johnson executed the quintessential fast-bowler’s wicket. Vijay’s fluent footwork and confident stroke play was obliterated by an over laced with unpredictable short and full pitched bowling.

Johnson then angled a perfectly pitched teaser across the right hander in the next over, and Vijay’s feet were stuck in mangrove mud. His hands offered a reactive stab at the passing ball and the result was a fine edge snaffled by Haddin. But I digress, Johnson’s first ball to Kohli is my focus.

Kohli ducked into a Johnson thunderbolt, taking the full brutish force in the front of the helmet. The Australian players and the umpire reacted immediately and surrounded Kohli to check his health; more evidence of the impact of recent events. Johnson was visibly shaken, but Kohli was fine and went on to score a brilliant hundred.

The media have made an enormous fuss about this and some commentators, from outside the game, have repeated their ridiculous call to review the bouncer.

But let’s be clear, it was not even a bouncer.

It was a waist height ball and Kohli, for whatever reason (probably poor judgement), ducked headlong into its path. It was reminiscent of a similar incident several years ago at the same venue. Sachin Tendulkar was struck somewhere on the shoulder after ducking into a thigh height Glenn McGrath delivery. He was given out plum LBW.

Day four is about to kick off. India are rattling along at 5/369 only 148 runs behind Australia. It’s a great Test match but the 60 overs lost to rain and poor light – unseasonable for Adelaide in December – may annul a result. Adelaide provides a great pitch to bat on, and Australia’s three centurions – Warner’s fine 145, Clarke’s “courageous” 128 and Smith’s 162 not out – had set Australia up.

The weather pushed Clarke into an overnight declaration and India’s batsmen have responded well. Something magical will be needed to extract a result for either side, almost certainly from one or more of the bowlers. The stage is set for the divisive Nathan Lyon. His dismal performance against Pakistan in the UAE and then a barren run in Shield matches caused myself and others to question the merit of his selection.Two good wickets yesterday act like a dam against a swelling river of public discontent. He needs wickets. He needs to bowl Australia to victory. Surely selection cannot be sustained on the promise of future success or the odd productive day.

Can Lyon do it at Adelaide or will India’s remaining batsmen set a lead and make in-roads into Australia’s inconsistent batting order? Australia are vulnerable given the mental pressure this side has endured since the tragic death of Phil Hughes.

Hope and Support for Phil Hughes

Tonight Phillip Hughes remains in a critical condition in intensive care after undergoing emergency surgery in a Sydney hospital. The young Test hopeful was struck by a bouncer while batting for South Australia in a Sheffield Shield match at the Sydney Cricket Ground. Hughes was attempting to play a pull shot in response to a short-pitched delivery from young New South Wales fast bowler Sean Abbott. After being struck, Hughes staggered for a moment before collapsing unconscious face-down on the pitch.

The NSW players quickly responded to the apparent seriousness of the situation and a number of players, officials and medical professionals took heroic action to ensure Hughes was treated appropriately and taken to hospital. Hughes was medi-cabbed to the side of the field where he received mouth to mouth resuscitation. An emergency helicopter landed at the ground, but Hughes was rushed to a nearby hospital in an ambulance.

The global cricket community has been totally shocked by this traumatic incident. The match has been abandoned and well wishes continue to flood in from across the globe for Phil Hughes. Support has also been expressed for Sean Abbott and the rest of the players and spectators who were present.

Cricket Froth expresses its fullest sympathy and support to Phil Hughes’ family and friends, and along with the rest of the cricket community, is hoping for a speedy recovery for the talented and highly popular young man.

Test Match Thrillers and an A Team Killer: India and Pakistan miss the rain and a future Protea nails 200 in Townsville

Rain nearly saved Pakistan and it should have saved India, but it denied both sides a reprieve and ensured thrilling finales to two Test Matches over the weekend. England’s destruction of India at Old Trafford was stunning and the quality of cricket on display at the Galle Fort in Sri Lanka was just as fine. The standard was high in (Cape) Townsville too, where South Africa A hammered Australia A in a solid game of cricket at the Riverway Arts and Cultural Precinct.

South Africa might have found a replacement for Jaques Kallis. Actually, cancel that. Kallis is irreplaceable. But, they may have uncovered a future Protea. Rilee Rossouw nailed a superb 231, which killed Australia A’s hopes on a wicket that saw them bowled out twice in four days. Rossouw averages 45 from 72 First Class matches and must be on the edge of Test selection. Temba Bavuma asserted himself with a grafting 162 and Australia A – consisting of 5 internationally capped and 3 Test Match capped players in Phil Hughes, Moises Henriques and Mathew Wade – simply couldn’t match South Africa A. The visitors attracted plenty of vocal support too with many local club cricketers attending, enjoying a few beers and creating a bit of good natured atmosphere from the hill.

But, could the crowds be better? If the small crowds during match 1 are anything to go by, then it would seem that Cricket Australia, Townsville City Council and perhaps the local cricket administrators could do more on the promotions front. On Friday afternoon that little stadium should be heaving with blue and white collar workers and it wouldn’t take much imagination or creativity to spark interest and greater involvement from local businesses and large employers. On a positive note, Cricket Australia announced today the sport has one million participants in Australia, a great result that should be the basis for further expansion.

The two A teams go at it again in Townsville this week beginning on Thursday 14 August. Peter Forrest and Clint McKay have been added to the Australian side and Phil Hughes has taken the captaincy off Moises Henriques who is out injured.

The scene in Townsville resembles Newlands in Cape Town as Gurinder Sandhu steams in and attempts to get a much needed wicket for Australia A against Sth Africa A.

On the Test scene India’s weak surrender to England on the third day in Manchester has created an alarming dilemma for MS Dhoni: where to find players who want to fight? India only needed to survive one afternoon. It absolutely pissed down with rain all of the next day. I mean, blokes were chipping catches to short fielders and trudging off as if preferring to escape to the hotel games room. Unbelievable. England’s bowlers were good, but not quite this is an unplayable Mitchell Johnson who’s going to kill you good.

Two weeks ago India led the series 1-0, perhaps mostly because England were poor and lacked tactical direction. Since then India have been reclassified as an invertebrate species and England have reacquainted with the spinal column and retaliated with more discipline and application. Leading 2-1 England can’t lose the series now, at worst they’ll draw it if India bounce back, but England should win 3-1 with a resounding victory at The Oval Test, which begins Friday. Will England miss Stuart Broad if he fails to play after breaking his nose? Probably not. Moeen Ali will simply take another 5 for and finish the job Jimmy Anderson is likely to start.

Stuart Broad’s broken nose

Perhaps the most startling result occurred in Sri Lanka. Wow. Is Test Cricket alive or what? Pakistan made 451 in the 1st innings with Younis Khan amassing 177. Bang that’s it. It’s going to be a draw. The Galle wicket will be a road. Sure enough Sri Lanka pump out 533 and you’re thinking, yep, draw. But, here comes Sri Lanka’s spin king Rangana Herath and there goes Pakistan for 180 on the final day. A lead of only 98. 126 balls remain in the Test Match, are they going to go for it? You betcha. They peel off the runs with 5 overs to spare. Seconds after the celebrations begin the rain falls on the Dutch fort and rolls across the ground. Pakistani players were last seen kicking the ground, while locals danced and sang in the rain. One of the great Test victories.

No I haven’t forgotten to mention Kumar Sangakarra… he smashed 221 in Sri Lanka’s 1st innings, his 37th Test Match tonne. He averages 58 from 125 Tests. In fairness Sri Lanka don’t play as many top line Test Matches as Australia, England or South Africa, but he would waltz into any of those nations’ teams and score just as many. A timeless legend.

At the Harare Sports Club Zimbabwe made a competitive 256 against South Africa who are 4/201 in reply. It is great to see Zimbabwe back in Test Match action and so far they are holding their own against a rebuilding, but still very good South African team.